Godzdogz

Godzdogz

The blog of the Dominican student brothers at Blackfriars, Oxford.

Built on the four pillars of our Dominican life – preaching, prayer, study, and community – Godzdogz offers many resources for exploring the Catholic Faith today.
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Praying with Savonarola in Lent

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

People are often quite surprised to discover that when Bl Pier Giorgio Frassati became a Dominican tertiary he took the name Girolamo Savonarola. On the face of it, their personalities and character are quite different, and while Bl Pier Giorgio could certainly be boisterous, he certainly does not seem to have the kind of temperament that one would associate with Savonarola. Read more

Doctors of the Church: Gregory the Great

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

By Br Albert Robertson | This series begins, in a way, in our own country, for it was St Gregory the Great who dispatched St Augustine to England on mission. According to Bede in his Ecclesiastical History, it was as Gregory was walking through the slave markets of Rome that he encountered some Angles, and was then heard to sayNon Angli, sed angeli, They are not Angles, but Angels. Anyone who has such an exalted view of the distant antecedents of today’s inhabitants of Britain can’t be too bad. Read more

Ad te levavi

Saturday, December 02, 2017
One of the least heard parts of the liturgy is probably the chant of the Proper of the Mass. These are the parts of the Mass which change with the season or the feast and consist in the Collect, Prayer Over the Offerings, and the Post Communion Prayer, and also three scriptural texts; the Introit, Offertory and Communion. These texts are often replaced by hymns, but you may hear them said by the priest at the beginning of the Mass or, in the case of the Communion Antiphon, just before or after the faithful have received Holy Communion. However, you almost certainly won’t have heard them sung to the proper chants appointed by the Church for use in the liturgy.  Read more

Neglected Books of the Old Testament: Haggai

Monday, November 27, 2017

Haggai suffers from pretty terrible neglect. There’s very little traditional liturgical use of the text by either Jews or Christians, and it suffers from an almost complete lack of exegetical interest. Among the few notable exceptions is Pseudo Epiphanius who in his Lives of the Prophets has Haggai as one of the first to return from the Babylonian exile, the first to sing ‘Alleluia’ in the ruins of the temple. Part of the reason for this neglect is because by most standards he seems something of a failed prophet.  Read more

Neglected Books of the Old Testament: Habbakuk

Monday, November 13, 2017
Habakkuk is a surprisingly Dominican minor prophet: his image appears twice on the fifth century wooden doors of Santa Sabina, one of our convents in Rome, and home to the Master of the Order.  Read more

Trinity

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Some time ago someone told me what I’m sure is a myth, that many bishops selected Trinity Sunday as a good day to issue a pastoral letter, so as to spare clergy the difficulty of preaching on the Trinity. It’s certainly true that a number of popular analogies tend to get us into tricky waters fairly quickly:
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Christological Psalms: Psalm 118: 20-25

Monday, May 08, 2017

Psalm 118 is one of the most frequently recited psalms in the Liturgy of the Hours, being sung on some Sundays either in its entirety at Morning Prayer or at Midday Prayer divided into three. Its association with Sunday, the Day of Resurrection, isn’t surprising, for it speaks throughout of triumph over all kinds of adversities, and of confidence in the salvation offered by God. The verses of the psalm are used in all kinds of liturgical occasions, and both Matthew and John have the crowds shouting, ‘Blessed be he who enters in the name of the Lord,’ (118:26) at Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday. Read more

Easter Sunday

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Most of us today are familiar with the cliche, ‘spiritual but not religious’. It’s such a cliche, that I’m not actually sure that people still say it, if they ever really did. But despite the cliche, it does reveal something about a particular mentality, not just in modern society, but of humans in general.  Read more

Psalm 143

Friday, March 31, 2017

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The Feast of St Patrick

Friday, March 17, 2017

On 17 March, people across the world will discover their long-forgotten Irish ancestry, or blithely ignore their lack of any relation to the Emerald Isle, and join together in celebration of St Patrick’s Day. But what’s really behind the celebrations? Read more

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